BETH BEDEE 
TOSA for Social Studies K-12 
Office: 352.726.1931 ext. 2490 
bedees@citrus.k12.fl.us
High School
For access to digital resources for the following 9-12 adopted textbooks, click on the title,
REQUIREMENTS
High school students are required to obtain three (3) credits in Social Studies:

One (1) credit must be in U.S. History.
  • US History EOC assessment performance will constitute 30 percent of the student’s final course grade if enrolled.
One (1) credit must be in World History.

A half (.5) credit must be in Economics with Financial Literacy.

A half (.5) credit must be in U.S. Government.
WORLD CULTURAL GEOGRAPHY

9th GRADE 
The primary content emphasis for this course pertains to the study of world cultural regions in terms of location, physical characteristics, demographics, historical changes, land use, and economic activity. Content should include, but is not limited to, the use of geographic tools and skills to gather and interpret data and to draw conclusions about physical and human patterns, the relationships between physical geography and the economic, political, social, cultural and historical aspects of human activity, patterns of population growth and settlement in different cultures and environments, the interaction between culture and technology in the use, alteration and conservation of the physical environment, and the interrelationships and interdependence of world cultures. 
 

Honors/Advanced courses follow the same standards, but offer scaffolded learning opportunities for students to develop the critical skills of analysis, synthesis, and evaluation in a more rigorous and reflective academic setting. Students are empowered to perform at higher levels as they engage in the following: analyzing historical documents and supplementary readings, working in the context of thematically categorized information, becoming proficient in note-taking, participating in Socratic seminars/discussions, emphasizing free-response and document-based writing, contrasting opposing viewpoints, solving problems, etc. Students will develop and demonstrate their skills through participation in a capstone and/or extended research-based paper/project (e.g., history fair, participatory citizenship project, mock congressional hearing, projects for competitive evaluation, investment portfolio contests, or other teacher-directed projects).
WORLD HISTORY

10th GRADE 
This course is a continued in-depth study of the history of civilizations and societies from the middle school course, and includes the history of civilizations and societies of North and South America. Students will be exposed to historical periods leading to the beginning of the 21st Century. So that students can clearly see the relationship between cause and effect in historical events, students should have the opportunity to review those fundamental ideas and events from ancient and classical civilizations.
 

UNITED STATES HISTORY

11th GRADE 
The primary content emphasis for this course pertains to the study of United States history from Reconstruction to the present day. Students will be exposed to the historical, geographic, political, economic, and sociological events which influenced the development of the United States and the resulting impact on world history. So that students can clearly see the relationship between cause and effect in historical events, students should have the opportunity to review those fundamental ideas and events which occurred before the end of Reconstruction.
 

UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT

12th GRADE 
The primary content for the course pertains to the study of government institutions and political processes and their historical impact on American society. Content should include, but is not limited to, the functions and purpose of government, the function of the state, the constitutional framework, federalism, separation of powers, functions of the three branches of government at the local, state and national level, and the political decision-making process.
 

ECONOMICS WITH FINANCIAL LITERACY

12th GRADE 
The primary content emphasis for this course pertains to the study of the concepts and processes of the national and international economic systems. Content should include, but is not limited to, currency, banking, and monetary policy, the fundamental concepts relevant to the major economic systems, the global market and economy, major economic theories and economists, the role and influence of the government and fiscal policies, economic measurements, tools, and methodology, financial and investment markets, and the business cycle.
 

ADVANCED PLACEMENT

Advanced Placement (AP) is the enrollment of an eligible secondary student in a course offered by the Advanced Placement Program administered by the College Board. Postsecondary credit for an AP course may be awarded to students who score a minimum of 3 on a 5-point scale on the corresponding AP exam.

ELECTIVES

These  Social Studies electives are options for high school students.  The student will recieve a half (.5) credit upon completion of the course.  These courses do not satisfy the  requirements for  any of the three (3) Social Studies credits,